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Author Topic: Where Did Everyone Go?  (Read 7921 times)
Mike
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« on: September 15, 2014, 09:55:23 PM »

Did I miss the signal to go deep and rig for silent running?
Myself, I got sucked into the "Great Academic Abyss" and am really starting to develop very specific opinions of the academic world - both good and bad.
It wasn't just that, though... in following the news and doing my own research, I think I might have needed some quiet time to process.

Everyone else, though?
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"When you're holding people's attention, I feel you must give them high-quality ingredients. They deserve nothing but your best. And if they need information, get it, cross-check it, and try to be right. Do not waste their time; do not enjoy the ego trip of being onstage."

Henry Rollins
Jim
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« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2014, 11:29:06 PM »

Unfortunately, the people who were the heaviest posters, are now no longer either on their boats (Torsk crew) or involved with their boats (Batfish).  Both the results of assinine management.   tickedoff
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Darrin
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« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2014, 07:28:36 AM »

I'm still here folks, just setting back and watching what is going on and like it has been said there are very few of us still posting due to not being with our resective boats anymore for the crew of the Torsk it has been 5 months since we were told not to come back and there still is no light at the end of the tunnel and the crew has started to find other things to do on their Saturdays. This year will be the first time in 17 years that the crew will NOT be onboard during the first weekend in October holding the annual Torsk Work Weekend which brings in the crew from around the country for a few days of working and telling sea stories.

Such a shame for not only the boat but the crew whom has maintained her so lovingly over the years and it is even worse for the Tourists whom aren't seeing anymore good changes to the Torsk

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Lance Dean
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« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2014, 11:34:40 PM »

There are many lurkers here.  I'm busy with two jobs and two kids. Tongue
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Fred Tannenbaum
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« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2014, 05:24:23 AM »

Preach, Lance!

Lots to do outside in the summer as well.
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Mike
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« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2014, 09:49:26 PM »

Nice to hear from you all.
I completely understand the points brought up. Over the last couple of weeks, I have been either knee-deep in trying to establish a good pattern for further studies, ankle deep in trying to keep abreast of the non-mainstream media (really? Tu-95's probing?), or sucked into personal drama.
It doesn't mean I stopped reading anything here, though.

It's unfortunate what Jim says, that "the heaviest posters are no longer either with their boats or involved with their boats". Again, however, I can completely relate. My hopes are that in time, either they will gravitate back towards them, or a newer generation will step up and resume the thankless but proud task of being caretakers. Both of these might cross the readers mind accompanied with a scoff and "Yeah...", and they aren't alone, for I have doubts about both as well...

HOWEVER, one can hope, and that's the one thing that cannot be taken away.


On a more unrelated thread, I'm slowly beginning to form questions about Japanese/Soviet subs from the same era. Aside from the quick Wiki-glance, has anyone else done any reading on them?
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"When you're holding people's attention, I feel you must give them high-quality ingredients. They deserve nothing but your best. And if they need information, get it, cross-check it, and try to be right. Do not waste their time; do not enjoy the ego trip of being onstage."

Henry Rollins
Fred Tannenbaum
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« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2014, 07:24:39 AM »

I've done quite a bit of reading on Japanese subs. Not as much on Soviet subs of the area but have several resources. I'm happy to try answering any queries, either on the board or private messages!
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Mike
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« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2014, 12:57:25 AM »

Hey, Fred -
The only book I've really touched so far is "I-Boat Captain" by Orita & Harrington... haven't finished it yet, but so far, it is interesting. I'm not allowing myself to get any other books from Amazon until I am done with the three I am reading so far, but the next one should be "Japanese Destroyer Captain: Pearl Harbor, Guadalcanal, Midway - The Great Naval Battles As Seen Through Japanese Eyes".

One of the things I have found frustrating during my visits to various museum boats is the severe lack of good books and other materials in the gift shops. It is frustrating only in the sense that, as a business, unrelated trinkets sell. I have a hard time, though, accepting the fact that the same stuff people can get at a generic souvenir shop (or even the local Wal-Mart) is more lucrative at a submarine museum, than a good 1:700 class model of an I-400, "Clear the Bridge", or even "Down Periscope".  Maybe it is just me, but in my deranged thought process, the people visiting there in the first place, are interested in the slightest in the subject and therefore a "ripe market".

Getting off the ever-present soapbox and back to the original topic, though, the perspective of our one time enemies is becoming more and more interesting. I recently introduced my wife to the old '50's "Duck And Cover" videos of the early days of the "Red Scare" and she thought the whole idea was amusingly silly.
"Duck under the desk? That is what they taught kids in America to do? Did peeple (this is how it sounds with the accent) really worry that much about us bombing them??" This, of course, led to a night's discussion of "McCarthyism", the "Arsenal of Democracy", the Tu-4 (still an amazing feat of reverse-engineering), the views held by most Americans about Soviet technology, and Harvey "Van" Clyburn... and, of course, lots of Russian Standard.
A little while later, I posed the the question of what is taught in Japanese schools about the Second World War to one of her fellow college students. Being quite Japanese, he smiled and proceeded to answer questions with questions and lead me on a mental Jujutsu routine in which nothing was answered fully, but a vague outline was hinted at.

Having lost my original point a bit, what have you and the other readers come across as far as factual readings about our adversaries turned allies (if you can call Russia that, at the moment... Tu-95's? Really? What is this 1974??)?
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"When you're holding people's attention, I feel you must give them high-quality ingredients. They deserve nothing but your best. And if they need information, get it, cross-check it, and try to be right. Do not waste their time; do not enjoy the ego trip of being onstage."

Henry Rollins
Karen D.
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« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2014, 04:02:18 PM »

I'm still around! Though from time to time I get too busy to visit the site, but I get back when I can. The Cobia newsletter is due in a few weeks, so I'll have another update soon. Speaking of being busy, I was out in San Francisco three weeks ago. We had an exhibit booth at the USSVI National Convention and I also had an opportunity to visit Rich and Pampanito! And just last week I was in Norfolk, VA attending the Historic Naval Ships Conference. Both were great events!
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Mike
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« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2014, 08:32:24 PM »

Good to hear, Karen... it sounds like it was pretty interesting. Perhaps I might be able to catch the next one.  Smiley
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"When you're holding people's attention, I feel you must give them high-quality ingredients. They deserve nothing but your best. And if they need information, get it, cross-check it, and try to be right. Do not waste their time; do not enjoy the ego trip of being onstage."

Henry Rollins
Fred Tannenbaum
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« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2014, 08:37:24 AM »

Mike, "I-Boat Captain" is a good read. It was probably the first submarine book I ever read many moons and I consider it so seminal that I bought a second copy a few years ago in a used book store. If you're looking for more about Japanese subs on the technical side, I recommend "Submarines of the Imperial Japanese Navy" by Dorr Carpenter and Norman Polmar, long out of print but available on the second-hand market, including eBay.

I am not yet aware of a book about Cold War submarine operations written from a Soviet point of view. A well written first-hand tome covering operations from the immediate post-war period to the late 1980s would attract my attention and earn a space on my shelves.
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nomad66
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« Reply #11 on: October 08, 2014, 08:53:21 AM »

I'm still around lurking, but have been really busy with duties at our Moose lodge.
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Mike
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« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2016, 06:30:12 PM »

Fred - the more I read, the more the idea of a Soviet book becomes both appealing and daunting...

Nomad - it just occured to me - what is the difference between a Moose and and Elk lodge?
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"When you're holding people's attention, I feel you must give them high-quality ingredients. They deserve nothing but your best. And if they need information, get it, cross-check it, and try to be right. Do not waste their time; do not enjoy the ego trip of being onstage."

Henry Rollins
Lance Dean
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« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2016, 11:51:05 AM »

Glad you guys are still around.   Wink
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Darrin
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« Reply #14 on: July 07, 2017, 09:19:06 PM »

Since my last post on here on this issue I can tell you sadly that I have moved on and away from the submarine community, It was a personal choice of mine and now I work semi retired for the Vintage Aviation Museum that is a new start up museum that I have been with from the ground up so far.

One of our projects is bringing a WWII PV-2 Lockheed Harpoon back to life once more and yes she did belong to the Navy in her career and was active during the last few months of WWII
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