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Author Topic: Status of the USS Clamagore and Patriots Point?  (Read 22245 times)
nomad66
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« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2009, 02:09:48 PM »

All 4 of us spent the entire day at Patriots Point on Monday July 27th. Overall we enjoyed the tours very much. I would have liked to meet some of the volunteers that work on the Clamagore, but everyone I talked to didn't seem to know much or care about my questions. As I said before, we did enjoy our visit and are glad we got a chance to see the boat and carrier. I was a little disapointed the other 2 ships were closed to touring. I hope this isn't taken the wrong way, but we all felt that there was something missing comparing the Clamagore to other subs we have toured and the Yorktown to the Lexington.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2009, 12:09:49 AM by nomad66 » Logged
Lance Dean
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« Reply #16 on: October 25, 2009, 08:56:07 PM »

More bad news.

http://www.postandcourier.com/news/2009/oct/25/dire-straits-at-patriots-point/

Dire straits at Patriots Point
Sunday, October 25, 2009

The public already had a clue about the problems facing the Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum when the USS Laffey, a World War II destroyer, was forced to undergo costly, emergency repairs this summer. But the $9.2 million expense of repairing "The Ship that Would Not Die" is a fraction of what's needed to fix up the museum's other two vessels. The staggering sums cited in a letter to the State Budget and Control Board say that the museum requires the attention of state and federal officials who might help keep it afloat.

John Hagerty, board chairman of the Patriots Point Development Authority, outlined the potential expense of repairing the aircraft carrier Yorktown, the centerpiece of the museum, and the submarine Clamagore in an Oct. 19 letter to the B&C Board. Repairing the Yorktown would cost an estimated $50 million to $150 million. Repairs to the Clamagore would cost $10 million to $25 million.

Meanwhile, Mr. Hagerty wrote that a federal allocation to repay the money spent on the Laffey repairs won't be forthcoming this year. Our report on Saturday noted that putting the ship into a better berth at Patriots Point will require additional work for which the authority also lacks funding.

The Department of the Navy, alerted to the problems of the Laffey and other ex-Navy vessels, sent a letter in June to all museums in the nation with ships donated by the Navy, asking for detailed plans related to their maintenance or their disposal. A Navy spokesman tells us the department is still waiting for a response from the Patriots Point Development Authority.

The Navy can demand an accounting for the vessels it donated to the museum, but worse timing would be hard to imagine -- and not just for Patriots Point. The nation may be emerging from a recession, but except for federal stimulus money there isn't much funding for capital projects. Many states, including South Carolina, have been struggling to maintain essential services. The Patriots Point Development Authority is a state agency, but is generally expected to pay its own way through admissions and other revenues.

The authority is in the process of putting together a master plan that will detail the work that needs to be done and provide suggestions to pay for it. But museum officials recognize that Patriots Point can't meet its responsibilities without assistance.

Mr. Hagerty wrote: "For the Patriots Point Development Authority to have a chance to obtain the funding to maintain these ships, an overall strategic approach needs to be developed to source these funds at the state and federal government levels and from private sources."

Dick Trammell, executive director of Patriots Point, says that disposal of the Yorktown and Clamagore is "not an option." It shouldn't be, but the Navy could probably force the issue under the terms of the agreement by which it donated the vessels to the museum. At this point, that would be both premature and counterproductive.

S.C. Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn McConnell is dismayed over the recurrent financial problems of Patriots Point and the emergency calls for ship repairs. "The state doesn't have $100 million," he tersely observed.

Sen. McConnell will ask the Legislature to approve a reorganization of the governing board for the Patriots Point Development Authority to provide for broader representation and oversight. And he will ask for a review of the authority by the Legislative Audit Council to suggest solutions to its fiscal woes. Both are good ideas.

But while comprehensive planning, reorganization, review and oversight could improve the responsible operation of this public agency, it is unlikely that any combination of the above can provide the solution to the pending demand for vessel repairs.

The attention of the state's congressional delegation is needed, recognizing the appropriate federal role in keeping the nation's historic treasures intact. All of the authority's vessels are designated as national historic monuments, and each has a storied history in defense of the United States. The Congressional Medal of Honor Museum, located on the Yorktown, is another reminder of the heroism of America's fighting men.

As Sen. McConnell says, the naval museum serves as "a monument to the generation that saved civilization."

The importance of keeping alive the memory of that generation should encourage immediate efforts toward long-term, comprehensive solutions for the museum's vessels and its management.
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navywrslr
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« Reply #17 on: October 27, 2009, 04:55:41 PM »

Sorry for replying so late,was laid off my job and been busy trying to find work.
The status of the Point is not good,the navy sent a letter to Patriots Point to either fix the ships or get rid of them. This is not really acceptable.
The USS Laffey is in drydock finally getting repaired,but there may not be a place to dock her when she gets out of drydock.
The Yorktown needs between 100 and 125 million dollars to fix her up,and the Clamagore needs between 15 and 25 million dollars. This is money the state doesnt have,and we are not expecting any help from Washington.
The process will not happen right away,but as it stands now,in about 5 years,Patriots Point and these historic ships will be gone.
To those of us who volunteer at the Point,and have served on the ships here,this isnt acceptable. The Clamagore is the last of her kind,no more FRAM 3 GUPPIES exist,she is a great ambassador to the public of Submarine History,and deserves to be saved.
Wish us luck.
STSCS(SS) Sid Busch,USN(RET)
« Last Edit: October 27, 2009, 04:57:20 PM by navywrslr » Logged
Darrin
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« Reply #18 on: October 27, 2009, 05:14:51 PM »

Sid,
thank you for the work that you do at Patriot's point, I can only hope that IF the Navy tells them to scrap them that someone can come in and save them at the last minute even if it means they leave Charleston not to come back.

Darrin
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navywrslr
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« Reply #19 on: October 27, 2009, 05:20:32 PM »

Darrin,
Thanks,I was just in Baltimore for the marathon a few weeks ago, I wasnt walking to good afterwards so wasnt able to get over to see the Torsk Saturday.  Made it over Sunday morning before having to leave,but she was closed. Stood there and admired all the great work you guys are doing,she really looks fantastic,I wish with all my heart that we can make the old 343 look that good.
Sid
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JTheotonio
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« Reply #20 on: October 28, 2009, 08:25:30 AM »

Former crew wants sub kept out of water (Post and Courier)

The sailors who crewed the 325-foot-long submarine Clamagore think it's time to pull the boat out of the water at Patriots Point and put it on display on dry land.

If not, they fear their Cold War memorial to the "Silent Service" will get lost to the elements, maybe forever. (read more at link below)

http://www.postandcourier.com/news/2009/oct/28/former-crew-wants-sub-kept-out-of-water/
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From the Forward Torpedo Room

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Darrin
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« Reply #21 on: October 28, 2009, 04:57:31 PM »

Sid,
I have no doubt that once they get her to a shipyard or at least pull her out of the water that you all will make her look good once more, if you go and look at the USS Cavalla she was in worse shape then the Clamagore (she was on land already) when her volunteer crew came to her rescue and brought her back to life and the life of the USS Stewart (DE-???)

Darrin
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