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Author Topic: Seeing how we have a Corpsman now...  (Read 4571 times)
Darrin
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« on: July 02, 2008, 09:40:07 AM »

On this bbs and we have yet to abuse I mean use his knowledge of the medical field,

How many of the museum boats have a good first aid kit and what is in your kits?Huh?

second do you and your docents know what can and can not done in treating a moron tourista that has stuck his/her finger in one of your fans or tripped going through the water tight doors and bounced off something that is not designed to move and now they have a bruise or small cut.. Not to mention your hard working volunteers who accidentally hurt themselves restoring your boat to it's former glory.

To the all important what do you do in case someone has a heart attack/passes out below decks???
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Rick
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« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2008, 10:35:44 AM »

Ah,  the dreaded disaster plan....

The first thing we do is remind everyone that visists that ithe submarine is a machine of war and not intended to be used as a playground.   We encourage them to look and and explor,  but to use the utmost common sense and be cautios at you can get hurt if you are not careful.

In the event of an emergency a staff member, preferably myself checkes the "patient" for severity of injury.  (is this a minor cut bruise or is there masive hemeraging are they pinned under a torpedo ect).   If possible move the "patient" to a quite place where they can calm down and be trated.  (put a bandage on and kiss the booboo).   If the "patient" is not mobile,   secure the so that no more guests can come through.   This will mean closeing the boat until the situation can be handled.   Contact EMS (police and fire) and keep the patient calm and still and calm until EMS do their job.     A Good old fasions First Aid course would not hurt either.   I like the old military style with lots of gory pictures to desesitise everone.   

Check your Office supply store,  they may be able to provide or to tell you where to get a good first aid kit.   Keep it secure,  I have found out that volunteers like to use this as their personal medicine cabinet.     

GRRRRRRRR

After everything is calmed down, be sure to leave the "patient" a way to contact you.   It doesn't hurt to offer a free visit or something from the gift shop (especially if it is a kid).   Always leave a good impression when they leave.   
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Lance Dean
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« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2008, 07:33:38 PM »

Who's the corpsman?  I'm dense.
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MWALLEN
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« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2008, 09:41:08 PM »

Quote
I have found out that volunteers like to use this as their personal medicine cabinet.

We do?   Shocked
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Darrin
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« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2008, 02:14:46 AM »

Lance,
the Corpsman is Larry Derouin AKA "TorskDoc" aka HN (Hospitalman) Derouin, AKA deck ape USS Torsk SS-423, AKA "bull #1 in the china shop followed by bull #2 shortly behind" who just by chance is a good friend and shipmate of mine....
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Lance Dean
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« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2008, 09:51:14 AM »

Cool Darrin.  I didn't put 2 and 2 together to realize TorskDoc was a HN.  Good to know!

Now can we scream "Mediiiic!!"?
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Rick
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« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2008, 10:03:41 AM »

Lance,

Who's the corpsman?  I'm dense.

I think he means Pharmists mate......  See we zoomies do know something....... 2funny

Martk

We do,  but I took care of the problem....
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Darrin
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« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2008, 01:53:32 PM »

Larry is a Hospitalman (HN) he never made third class and yes they are called Corpsman, he is a good shipmate and friend. Please abuse... I mean use his knowledge because he was also an EMT for a few years.
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Lance Dean
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« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2008, 08:29:01 PM »

Cool!  Bill Lee "Viejo" drove an ambulance I believe for a while.

Darrin, in response to your original question, I had never really thought about what all you said before.
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Paul Farace
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« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2008, 11:57:58 PM »

Our Bosun, Darrell, is known on a firstname basis by most of the nurses and docs in the emergency room... and USS COD has a standing account with them and the Workmans' comp case workers.   coolsmiley

Beyond that we have an entire collection of first aid kits, most of them empty or near empty... one has packets of sugar and sugar subtitute for the coffee maker.  We keep a "nasty spill" kit available below in the boat for vomit, urine, feces, and other bodily secretions (some of which have happened!!!)... the kit gets use and would be a good idea for all of you. You never know when a cub scout will step into the control room and just before you can tell him and his buddies why "every day is Christmas Day on subs"  (because the christmas tree is lit!!!)  he barfs up a ton of carrots (thank God the kid ate an entire bowl of carrots... if it was anything else, the mess would have been horrible!!!)... and mass co-sicknesses, if you get my drift.  In any case, Mr. Super Curator sprang into action and deployed the bodily fluid kit -- and thank God our Marine volunteer had most of the mess cleaned up by the time I could get the kit opened and ready for use!

Kit contains, in a box:

Roll of quality paper towels
Chlorox Spray disintectant
Rubber gloves, several pairs
Odoban spray (would make even your crap smell like flowers!)
Empty gallon size sealing plastic bags to put the soiled towels
Oust spary deodorizer (stuff works!)
Regular 409 spray cleaner (not all surfaces want to be doused with Chlorox)...
disposable respirator masks (the white cheapie kind) that you can spray the Oust into to prevent the worst smellls from penetrating
Box of Chlorox surface wipes

BTW:

the Marine said all the the carrots needed was a little more butter...    buck2
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Darrin
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« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2008, 12:38:29 PM »

I do know that our kit in the LLAB contains various sizes of bandaids, gauze in various different sizes, alcohol wipes, surgical tape and at 1 time I think there was even saline in the kit along with a bottle of rubbing alcohol. Now for the not so needed stuff.... Flexible splints, those are great when or IF a tourista/volunteer twists an ankle, a number of ACE wraps (bandages), a small and large breathing tube (to be inserted down the throat of an unconcious tourista) and those are ONLY used by those trained on the proper technic on inserting them (there are a couple of us that have been trained and have used them AWAY from the boat).

With an open wound the only thing that you can/should do is:

1.) try to stop the bleeding, remember if a pressure dressing does not work and EMS has NOT arrived then you need to consider while talking to them on the phone and the severity of the bleeding that to save the patients life you may have to put a torniqute on and that is a LAST resort method due to the reponse time of the EMS. IF you have to do the torniqute you have to put it 2" above the wound and not on a joint or around their NECK 2funny
2.) Once the bleeding is stopped keep pressure on it if it is required and do NOT change the bandages no matter how bad you want too, IMEDIATELY take pics of the area where the accident occured... this may come back and save your butt or your museums butt when the tourista's try to SUE you for damages that they have done to themselves. As soon as the pics have been taken and EMS/Police show up and taken statements from those around the scene when it happend then and only then do you start to clean up.
3.) Warm soapy water while wearing gloves is a REQUIREMENT in my book because you have no clue as to what that individual has in their blood and you do not want to get the gift that eventually takes your life because of them.

Once the inital clean up is done bleach and Hot water to disinfect the whole area until you are completely satisfied that it is cleaned up and there is no evidence to show the others that are coming through that there was an accident.

Head wounds bleed badly even thought the cut may be small, things to look for when treating a head wound:

1.) patient is tired and wants to go to sleep... DO NOT LET THEM
2.) there is bone fragments or other objects in the wound.. DO NOT TRY TO REMOVE THEM or even touch them
3.) clear fluid coming from the area of the wound or from the ears and nose.. may indicate bad damage to the head.
4.) IF no one saw the person fall or hit their head do not allow them to look around especially if you find them on the deck. STABALIZE the patient where they lay and do NOT try to move them until EMS shows up and puts them in a neck brace and depending on the severity on a back board.

NOW for my all time favorite wound to deal with?Huh?Huh?? the eyes  Undecided

IF one of your vols or one of your touristas just happen to be in the area that grinding/sandblasting or cutting is taking place and gets a object stuck in their eye... What do you do?Huh?

1.) calm the patient
2.) DO NOT try to remove the object
3.) using gauze gently pack around the object in question if possible and then cover the other eye
4.) explain to the patient that the reason for covering both eyes is so that their eyes will stay hopefully looking in one place  and that once the gauze is in place on the other eye it becomes dominate and wants to drag the other one with it and it will cause more damage to the eye due to the pariticle hanging out of their eye and you have put gauze on that eye to keep any infection out.
5.) Call EMS immediately and have all of the patients information if possible (this goes for all above mentioned items folks) IE: Name, how old, male/female (ya never know these days), and a good contact number for a friend or family if they came by themselves so that they can be called to notify them that they are going to the hospital. Are they alergic to any meds, what meds are they currently taking, the reason behind that is so that EMS can start treatment ASAP and get the patient treated as fast as possible


Darrin
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Darrin
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« Reply #11 on: July 04, 2008, 02:00:33 PM »

Let me rephrase that last one.... IF the object protrudes from their eye then you need to put gauze around it and the other eye.. IF it is a little bit of sand/rust an eye wash station should be able to wash that out and IF you don't have that use a bottle of water and get the victim to turn their head and lean over so you can was the particle out if possible, and IF you can't then recommend a trip to the hospital either in a ambulance or in a car with SOMEONE else driving
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