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Author Topic: School of the boat 30 Sept 08 (Air systems part 2)  (Read 2764 times)
Darrin
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« on: September 30, 2008, 06:51:34 PM »

I am laughing my butt off right now because a friend and shipmate of mine caught me in a VERY grey area with what I was looking for for this weeks school of the boat.... So that leads to the PART 2 of this one.   

Now that Chief Mike has covered the basic's for running an air charge on the boat and honestly I believe that he did that one from memory (he probably has done that one a few hundered times on Torsk) and while MOST of our boats are completely and totally unable to submerge and resurface once more without ANY damage done to the interior of the boat. I remembered that there are a FEW boats that are capable of shutting their origional hatches (they are lucky enough not to have ladders in the weapons shipping hatches) and doing this IF needed... and the first boat that came to mind was the USS COD and yes I did take the virtual tour of the COD and the only thing that I can say is WOW, I AM JEALOUS smitten   BUT there are a number of boats that want to dethrone Martha and the COD for one of the number 1 spots as the best museum boats in the country, and with that being said let the games begin...

Part 2 of the Air system operation is OPERATING the 225 PSI system to include blowing of the all of the tanks associated with that system.

Good luck all,
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emeacho
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« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2008, 12:35:49 PM »

You don't ask for much, do you?  Maybe after work weekend I'll try one or two.  There are one heck of a lot of tanks blown by air and each is unique.  Like part of blowing a sanitary tank is to close the drains into the tank, put a water seal on the shitters, cranking up the pressure, and opening the overboard.
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Darrin
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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2008, 01:14:52 PM »

Chief,
you and I and others who have done it before on different class boats know how much is involved in operating these systems and we had to learn these systems and how to operate them in our quals (or at least us NON NUKE folks had to know how to do it) 2funny 
There are a number of tanks that are using the 225 PSI and below and each requires a different lineup as Chief Mike pointed out, so with that being said someone can start with a pair of tanks then hand it off to someone else until it is done.
And JT you do get to participate in this one if you would like to Wink
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Mark Sarsfield
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« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2008, 02:16:48 PM »

Referencing Chapter 9 of the fleet boat... (http://www.hnsa.org/doc/fleetsub/air/chap9.htm#9A)... I'll tackle the first two sections with copy and paste Smiley

A. CUTTING IN THE 225-POUND SERVICE AIR FORE AND AFT
 
 
9A1. Preparation.
1. Supply high-pressure air to the two 225-pound reducers.

2. Open the supply valve to the 225-pound service air manifold at each 225-pound reducer, so that low-pressure air is being supplied to the manifold.

3. Shut all the valves on the 225-pound service air manifold.

9A2. Steps in operation.

1. Remove the locking cap from the forward service air line valve on the 225-pound service air manifold in the control room.

2. Open the forward service air line valve.

3. Remove the locking cap from the after service air line valve on the 225-pound service air manifold in the control room.

4. Open the after service air line valve.

5. Lock open the forward service air line valve by replacing the locking cap and securing the padlock.

6. Lock open the after service air line valve by replacing the locking cap and securing the padlock.

The 225-pound service air manifold is now rigged to supply service air fore and aft.


B. PUTTING PRESSURE IN THE FORWARD TRIM TANK
 
9B1. Preparation.
1. Rig the 225-pound service air manifold. (See Section 9A.)

2. This results in the following:

a. The forward and after service air line valves on the 225-pound service air manifold are locked open.

b. There is 225-pound air in the forward and after service air lines.

9B2. Steps in operation.
1. Open the forward trim tank blow valve on the 225-pound service air manifold in the control room.

2. Observe the forward trim tank pressure gage over the manifold, when the required pressure, is reached.

3. Shut the forward trim tank blow valve on the manifold.
 

 
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Regards,
Mark Sarsfield
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"If you have one bucket that can hold 5 gallons and one bucket that can hold 2 gallons, how many buckets do you have?" - IQ test from Idiocracy
Darrin
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« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2008, 06:17:37 PM »

VERY GOOD Mark, wasn't expecting that one until after the DC was done but THANK YOU for finishing that block
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Mark Sarsfield
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« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2008, 10:02:55 AM »

Pasting is easy. Smiley  There's still a lot that I didn't copy and paste from the manual from that section.
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Regards,
Mark Sarsfield
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"If you have one bucket that can hold 5 gallons and one bucket that can hold 2 gallons, how many buckets do you have?" - IQ test from Idiocracy
JTheotonio
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« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2008, 05:45:52 PM »

You are on a roll Mark - well done.
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