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Author Topic: FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEM  (Read 19988 times)
Mark Sarsfield
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« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2008, 02:47:38 PM »

It's an excellent post.  I guess superstition still runs through the modern Navy.
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Shipwreck
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« Reply #16 on: October 06, 2008, 02:50:28 PM »

And that was with an entire trained crew!  Man!

All of this is great info and discussion and I think it importnat that we think like this.  I wasn't trying to come off as chicken little by the way, just in case my comments seemed like that.  Fire is my WORST fear and I like to avoid it if at all possible.

As for the fire department, coming out would be a good idea and I am certain they would appreciate at least two drills a year on the boat for training.  Firemen love that kind of stuff and a sub is a great challenge.  I also agree with the ABC extinguishers as that is the least expensive choice too.  I would love to be able to close the hatches by a zip tie could be snapped just as easily by someone fancying to close the hatch.  I would think someting more along the lines of a carbiner or something that would hold a yank or two by curious folks.  It would also behoove us to make sure they all work/secure properly too.  A fire drill would be an awesome thing for the BLHA to experience next time we stay on the boat.  Fog machine and all.

Darrin, THANK YOU for your list too - some great things!  I would love for us to eventually have a fire control plan book, etc.  Thank you everyone for your help on this topic!

So, on the 18th this is just one more thing Rick and I will be discussing.

BTW, I don't recall seeing one, but surely there is a fire hydrant somewhere nearby the boat.  Any of the Batfish gang remember one?
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Sincerely,

Bradley Wynn
PO Box 711
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Mission Statement:   “The USS Batfish War Memorial remembers those who have served, preserves the legacy they leave behind, and educates those who come after, of lives touched by war in the fight and hope for peace.”

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JohnG
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« Reply #17 on: October 06, 2008, 02:53:57 PM »

I just thought of this, be weary on calling the FD for them to inspect. Maybe this is me just worrying for no reason, but if we are so out of code or what have you they try to close the sub?  Embarrassed

Just an idea....maybe they will come in and just tell us what needs to be done and not "grade" us.
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"If crime fighters fight crime and fire fighters fight fire, what do freedom fighters fight?" ~George Carlin
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« Reply #18 on: October 06, 2008, 02:58:15 PM »

My worries too, hence trying to keep it low key.  But we will have to call on them soon, regardless.  As for maybe out of code - I'm trying to determine how a WWII sub can be in code - I see a challenge (probably expensive one) ahead.
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Bradley Wynn
PO Box 711
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OFC/FAX:  (405) 601-1950
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bradley@scriptfolio.net
www.ussbatfish.com

Mission Statement:   “The USS Batfish War Memorial remembers those who have served, preserves the legacy they leave behind, and educates those who come after, of lives touched by war in the fight and hope for peace.”

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MWALLEN
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« Reply #19 on: October 06, 2008, 03:00:15 PM »

Quote
BTW, I don't recall seeing one, but surely there is a fire hydrant somewhere nearby the boat.  Any of the Batfish gang remember one?

Sorry Bradley - I can't seem to recall one being there...but I haven't been looking for one either.  Rick???

Quote
but if we are so out of code or what have you they try to close the sub?

Good question John.  I don't know if the annual Navy inspection takes that into consideration or not.  Rick - under what jurisdiction would that fall?  City or Navy?
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Mark Sarsfield
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« Reply #20 on: October 06, 2008, 03:10:10 PM »

There is a hydrant on the very edge of the front of the museum property near the pole gate.  It's a long distance from the boat and the firemen have several obstacles to navigate with a hose just to reach the stern.

I wonder what the vets did for a fire plan 35 years ago when they opened for business?
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Mark Sarsfield
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"If you have one bucket that can hold 5 gallons and one bucket that can hold 2 gallons, how many buckets do you have?" - IQ test from Idiocracy
JohnG
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« Reply #21 on: October 06, 2008, 03:25:42 PM »

Ya the hydrant is a stretch but they can use it at the boat. (Thats how we filled the pond after making it ^_^)

As far as Jurisdiction I would ask the Navy first, then the locals. It would take the Navy a longer time to try and shut us down than the locals. Thats in a worst case scenario though. I have to agree, how can a WW2 boat be up to code? But I think that as long as we have extiguishers there, 2-3 exits, and keep cooking to a minimum we will be all right.
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« Reply #22 on: October 06, 2008, 03:29:17 PM »

The vets 35 years ago probably didn't have a plan.  That just wasn't the thinking then.  Nothing meant toward the vets - I mean in general, folks just didn't think like that then.  Fire plans were like the last thing on people's minds, especially when it came to something like a WWII sub.

I may have to include the installation of two fire plugs to our boat and building too in the proposal.  That wouldn't be a bad idea.  The further the plug the longer the fire rages.  Plus, I don't really know what the Muskogee fire department is capable of handling when it comes to our site.  Wow - what a lot to think on,
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Bradley Wynn
PO Box 711
Oklahoma City, OK 73101-0711
OFC/FAX:  (405) 601-1950
CELL:  (405) 833-1727
bradley@scriptfolio.net
www.ussbatfish.com

Mission Statement:   “The USS Batfish War Memorial remembers those who have served, preserves the legacy they leave behind, and educates those who come after, of lives touched by war in the fight and hope for peace.”

Member Batfish Living History Association: www.ss310.com
Darrin
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« Reply #23 on: October 06, 2008, 03:50:50 PM »

To answer your question about being up to today's fire codes?Huh???  2funny  Does NAVSEA know this?Huh?? yes they do and I have been told that Torsk was "grandfather claused" because of her age and I ass/u/me that it is that way for the rest of the boats that are museums.

One more really cheap and safe thing to buy is reflective tape to go on your bulk head flappers for your ventilation system (use different colors to show open or shut if possible if unable to then make those 1 color only and then the rest of these items a different color please) and then for your water tight doors and finally for your trip hazards or areas that are difficult for a large person to get around (i.e. FER between the KLINGENSMIDT evap and the fwd part of F/M#1 going into the after battery head). The reason behind this is IF you loose power and your emergency lights come on you and your vols/tourists will be able to find there way out without beating themselves to death and two when or IF you use your fog machine you and F&ES will be able to see going in and out and IF you weren't able to shut the ventilation off they hopefully will be able to do so just by telling them to look for the RED or whatever colored reflective tape on the bulkhead at specific places through the boat.
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Mark Sarsfield
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« Reply #24 on: October 06, 2008, 03:51:44 PM »

With new wiring on the boat (hopefully) our chances of an electrical fire will be minimal.

Speaking of cooking, we should look into getting someone to clean out all of the ventilation ducts.  60 years of grease, mold, dust, etc. is growing in that stuff.  The filter in the stove hood vent looks really nasty, too.

The ventilation doors will take some work.  Currently, some of the openings are used for speaker wiring.  The wire needs to be rerouted and the doors need some TLC.

« Last Edit: October 06, 2008, 03:53:48 PM by Mark Sarsfield » Logged


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Mark Sarsfield
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"If you have one bucket that can hold 5 gallons and one bucket that can hold 2 gallons, how many buckets do you have?" - IQ test from Idiocracy
JTheotonio
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« Reply #25 on: October 06, 2008, 07:35:25 PM »

It would be simple to put together a plan and a training program for each boat (can be pretty generic depending on what you have).  A simple document would help each boat develop a plan. I can help so let me know.
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Darrin
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« Reply #26 on: October 06, 2008, 08:20:36 PM »

John,
because YOU are my friend and fellow TM Wink  and because you have inadvertanly volunteered for that mission  2funny 
I charge you with teaching the SCHOOL OF THE BOAT for 7 Oct 2008..........  and Officially I am going to SUSPEND all of the school of the boat classes that were not completed (225 PSI operation) until SUBMARINE DAMAGE CONTROL is completed
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Darrin
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« Reply #27 on: October 06, 2008, 08:41:47 PM »

Hey SHIPWRECK, you weren't being chicken little on this issue and don't hesitate to ask questions here about a submarine because I am SURE that there is someone who will answer your questions  knuppel2
And I did the same thing when the K-77 (Juliette 484) sank in Providence, Rhode Island sank.... That to me was an eye opener to ALL of the boats still in the water, part of me to this day wonders IF I was able to help save another boat.... and yes I do believe that I helped inadvertantly save one or more of our boats so that future generations can see them..

Torsk after that was able to acquire and get running a complete P-100 and all associated hoses to go with that to de-water the boat from topside IF needed (GOD forbid) and I know that others have re-looked at their DC plans.

And sadly enough I had yet to cover anything to do with fire and flooding during the school of the boat because DEEP DOWN, I HATE fires onboard a submarine.. I can fight fires all day long in a barn or a building or a house but NOT being able to leave your home that is on fire to this day scares the living heck out of me and watching the compartments around you go from being crystal clear to the point of barely able to see your hand infront of your face is disturbing as hell to me.

Flooding,  I have lived through it and honestly IF a boat that I was on had flooded and I was in the rack I would have never KNOWN if the boat IMPLODED because they don't take too much at deep depths. The last time we weren't too deep (150' maybe) and the hull valve blew off on the evaporator due to the shipyard screw ups and being on watch in the Torpedo Room during a drill it wasn't a big thing because they at the time were running a drill in the compartment AFT of it and once the valve blew off they shifted the training to the real thing and went at it.. Obviously we made it to the surface and it took a while and a failed EMBT blow (busted line) but obviously it surfaced because the crew of that boat (along with me) are still here..

Many people have forgotten that these museum submarines are true warships and they can and will kill you if you let them... A lot of people don't understand what they actually did other then to make them look pretty and tell their stories and I HOPE that they NEVER find out what happens in case of an emergency onboard their boat. ANd no Paul I wasn't busting your chops (others are involved and not just you)

I cannot stress it enough that Damage Control starts with the basics.... LEARN your boat and then learn how to handle ANY situation that comes across your plate in regards to Damage Control within reason.

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JTheotonio
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« Reply #28 on: October 06, 2008, 09:06:54 PM »

OK Darrin, I will work on a question or two for DC - big concern on any boat is responding to an emergency.  On the surface is somewhat different that submerged.  Sooo maybe questions will be with both in mind.  Knowing that TM's are far more knowledgeable in DC - we shall see what others can do.  I shall throw down the gauntlet!
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« Reply #29 on: October 06, 2008, 09:29:52 PM »

Picuda was out on standard ops in the Dry Tortuga's off Key West circa 1965.  About the second or third dive of the day we had the collusion alarm go off - "Flooding in Forward Engine Room" I, being a good TM was laying in my bunk in the bridal suite in the Forward Torpedo Room - emergencies are a quick way to wake a person up - by the time I got right we were at a 29 degree up angle heading for the surface.  On top, we got a report of 6 feet of water in the forward engine room and pumping had commenced.  When dry we found that the small Model X 1,000 vapor compression distilling unit sea valve failed.  (CO was pissed)

We went into port and had "yard birds" work all night fixing the valve.  We went out the next day and our first drive was controlled.  Well about 60 feet that damn valve failed again - more flooding only not as bad.  (CO was more than pissed)

So we went back and the "yard birds" got an ear full and worked again all night.  Next day it way OK.

What do you get from my story?  Well life hangs in a balance when riding boats.  It therefore depends on good training in all emergencies to help mitigate a situation that perils the boat and your life.

As a young 19 year old I never thought about it - just do!

What's the main point of qualifying? Well   it boils down to JUST DO! Because it is your life and the saving of everyone else. As we train for submarine duty we understand the risks and we know the results of failure of anyone of us to know what to do.  I knew of no one on the Picuda or Von Steuben that made me worry about my life.

Museum boats are no different, in fact maybe they are different because  we have civilians on board and they do not know what to do in an emergency. So you must be able to act and react for those who may panic and get in your way.
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