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Author Topic: Air System  (Read 8340 times)
Mark Sarsfield
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« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2008, 02:21:25 PM »

None come to mind, but that doesn't mean that they aren't there.  They may have bene capped off.

That's a good point about the LP Blower in the pump room.  That explains why you guys picked a head to backfeed the system with a compressor instead of the pump room.  Although, if we find an air tool connection down there, that would probably be a better place to put the compressor.

One thing for us to keep in mind is that Rick shuts the power off at night and on Monday and Tuesday.  So, the compressor would not be keeping the system charged all the time.


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Mark Sarsfield
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"If you have one bucket that can hold 5 gallons and one bucket that can hold 2 gallons, how many buckets do you have?" - IQ test from Idiocracy
Ctwilley
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« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2008, 02:27:12 PM »

It would probably be one of the systems that we only brought online during an event or work day. It probably wouldn't be feasable to keep it up all the time.
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Rick
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« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2008, 02:45:45 PM »

boy this is getting to be fun.  I come down like God to place commandment upon my loyal and trusty followers.       angel

1. Thou shalt receive the smaller compressor. This compressor is being doanted by a lovely widow and mother of veterains.  If we need a large compressor will will be looing at a fund raising project to which I am not against having both.  The small will allow us to have a compressor on ste until a larger system can be established and we will have a secondary on site to work on the external displays to which there will be many...

2. Thou shalt document, document, document.   This is another system that will requre proper training to use.  I do not want you all to go to all the troble to put this together and have it botched up by a wayward person.

3. Thou Shalt conservest power.   I agree that this system shoudl not be charged unless we are using it.  I can just imagin some jokester playing with one of the valves and generating a permanent air leak for all the tourist to enjoy.   Alos this does prove to be somewhat of a safty issue to have it presurized permanently.  I think a seperate cerciut to provide power to the compressors would be a good thing.   just like we are discussing for the Galley.

4. Thou Shalt not commint any harm upon thyselves.   Seriously.  be careful.  We are dealing with a 65 year old system that has not been checked since 1969.  I do not want any injuries.

As usual,  this subject is open to discussion...

rick
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Mark Sarsfield
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« Reply #18 on: October 08, 2008, 04:00:54 PM »

When we first go to test the system, we will need to keep it charged over a period weeks along the methods that were spelled out in previous posts by the Torsk guys.  As far as I know all control valve handles can be removed in the con when they are not being used.  This should eliminate any tampering by visitors.  Keeping the heads closed would help, too.  If they find a random valve in another compartment, the hissing should be obvious.  This is one of those things where you would have to walk through the boat after closing time each day to listen for any [failed of visitor caused] leaks - kill the A/C, first.  Once the system has been tested out and proven that it can handle the max pressure from the donated compressor, then I agree that it can be left off until we really need it.  It sounds like 4 to 5 hours would be needed to get the system fully charged.  If we're going to have a work day or event, we could turn it on the day before at closing time and just let it charge all night.
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Mark Sarsfield
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"If you have one bucket that can hold 5 gallons and one bucket that can hold 2 gallons, how many buckets do you have?" - IQ test from Idiocracy
Ctwilley
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« Reply #19 on: October 09, 2008, 08:09:54 AM »

You know, we need to have a single seperate breaker box since the public can't be allowed to energize the galley, air compressors, pumps, and any other wigit or gizmo that we get working. None of the systems that we restore can or even will be used on a daily basis so we might want to limit all of these with a lockable breaker box that has all of the various switches.
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Rick
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« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2008, 01:05:00 PM »

Again,  we need to figure this wireing system out.

rick
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Darrin
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« Reply #21 on: October 09, 2008, 02:18:59 PM »

Hand over hand and or a nice tone generator have done wonders with figuring some of ours out, our galley and pumps have had the fuses removed and tagged out so there isn't any inadverdant useage. The Air Compressor is in LLAB and it stays locked unless the volunteers are onboard and we as far as I know are the only ones who operate it
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Ctwilley
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« Reply #22 on: October 09, 2008, 03:14:22 PM »

You know guys, maybe we should make the electrics our next project before the air system. Rick has a point. It's a huge task but if we can get it done, we'll be able to slowly bring all of these items up a lot easier than if we're trying to figure out why the compressor won't turn on. The movie Christmas Vacation comes to mind. We could spend months putting together all of these systems to find that they won't work. Then someone turns on the fan in the ward room and everything comes on at once.
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Rick
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« Reply #23 on: October 09, 2008, 05:32:18 PM »

here Kitty kitty kitty........ Grin
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torskdoc
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« Reply #24 on: October 09, 2008, 07:45:00 PM »

When we first go to test the system, we will need to keep it charged over a period weeks along the methods that were spelled out in previous posts by the Torsk guys. 


Remember a couple of things here.  Unless your valves have hammer handles, you should have a special wrench to open the banks.  The 225# system MUST NOT be energized (air from the banks or a compressor) while no one (vols/management) is aboard. Unless the touristas are carrying a wrench (12" cresent) then they aren't gonna energize the system.  Just keep the banks shut when not using them.  You could also put "DANGER" tags on the valves themselves.  Tends to keep prying hands away.


1.) Attach the small compressor to a Q.D. in one of the Torpedo rooms.  Bring the pressure up in the header line ONLY, SLOWLY!  Check all the, Salvage air Valves, these are on both sides of the W.T. bulkhead although the air line is on one side only.  (chain them down in centered posit. so they can't turn).  There should be a valve with a drain in the AER STBD Side, outboard of the Genset.  It's for the compensating tank or the (I can't remember the other one).  Also on TORSK there is an emergency engine shutdown valve over the STBD Controllerman's posit. that runs off the 225# system.  As your's is a center cubicle, and DOESN'T have a snorkel, you may NOT have this particular set-up. 

2.) The 225# system ALSO charges the IMPULSE AIR BANKS in the Torpsedo rooms.  Double check that the inlet valve in both rooms is SHUT, Locked and Tagged BEFORE initial lite off.

3.) The Q.D.'s are usually near the ends of the compartments. Torpedo room it's near the Impulse air manifold on STBD Side. In Control it's above the manifold that has the control valves for 225# FWD, and AFT, #1 Aux, #2 Aux, Safety Blow.  Engine Rooms are outboard the STBD Side engines FWD.  Maneuvering should be near the Lathe Position(not sure for single cube boat). 

4.) Topside you should have a hull stop in the Control room just above the Nav Table.  This covers the Ships Whistle, and 1-possibly 2 Q.D.'s on either side of the fairwater, near the teardrop shape hole(which is where the dockside HP charging air connection is. 

5.) Once you prove out the header, Compartment Salvage Air Valves, and associated Q.D.'s are tight and working correctly (includes the main gauge for 2225# air on the Main air gauge board). Then you can use the header for tools.  You can isolate the banks from the header, by 2-3 valves and work on them while having the compressor work the header directly. 

The setup on TORSK is different than Batfish.  Pictures show what we did.  But you will have to physically hand over hand your system to prove it out and rule out any problems. 

WATCH OUT FOR PRESERVATIVE in the LINES!!!  Shocked It will SPRAY all over if you're not careful.  Take a hose on the end of the system and valve it.  Build up 50#.  Open the valve into a semi closed bucket and run the compressor for 20 minutes or so to get as much as you can out of the main header.  You may have to open each Compt. Salv. Air Valve to get out the pockets of preservative in the side lines.  Wear Ponchos!!!


Then work on each bank in turn.  Start from the manifold, and open each connection in turn, refresh the o-rings, and button each connection up.  Take each hull stop off and tear it down, repack the stem, lap the seat if needed, and put in new o-rings.  Once you get it all buttoned up, then test the bank.  Again do one bank at a time. 

Another + is that the water system runs off air pressure.  Up to you guys whether you want to get into that.


Doc
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Stick out yer arm, It won't hurt Me a bit.......
Darrin
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« Reply #25 on: October 09, 2008, 08:07:47 PM »

Thanks Doc for stepping up to the plate and helping the Batfish out, I appreciate it Wink
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emeacho
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« Reply #26 on: October 10, 2008, 12:27:21 PM »

Having a good understanding of your electrical system sure would be a good idea!  We spent a couple of years tracing out the original ship's electrical distribution systems and then we documented everything.  It was just like making qual drawings, but more detailed.  This helps us no to figure out where equipment receives its power and where to find blown fuses, which occurs regularly.  Someone is always wanting to plug in a grinder, two drills, a power saw, etc etc to the same circuit.

We also completely replaced our shore power electrical system because it was totally inadequate once we began the true restoration of the boat.  The original shore power system was fine when all it had to power was the temporary lighting that was strung through the boat.

The key, though, is documenting.  Make drawings and document any changes you make to the original ship's wiring.
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Darrin
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« Reply #27 on: October 10, 2008, 01:04:42 PM »

Chief,
ya did good but you missed one point.... THE KEY TO RESTORING ANYTHING IS TO DOCUMENT EVERYTHING AS YOU GO SO THAT EVERYONE THAT COMES AFTER YOU WILL KNOW what you did while you were onboard so that they don't have to make the same mistakes that we made...   
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Rick
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« Reply #28 on: October 10, 2008, 01:17:14 PM »

Chief,
ya did good but you missed one point.... THE KEY TO RESTORING ANYTHING IS TO DOCUMENT EVERYTHING AS YOU GO SO THAT EVERYONE THAT COMES AFTER YOU WILL KNOW what you did while you were onboard so that they don't have to make the same mistakes that we made...  
Having a good understanding of your electrical system sure would be a good idea!  We spent a couple of years tracing out the original ship's electrical distribution systems and then we documented everything.  It was just like making qual drawings, but more detailed.  This helps us no to figure out where equipment receives its power and where to find blown fuses, which occurs regularly.  Someone is always wanting to plug in a grinder, two drills, a power saw, etc etc to the same circuit.

We also completely replaced our shore power electrical system because it was totally inadequate once we began the true restoration of the boat.  The original shore power system was fine when all it had to power was the temporary lighting that was strung through the boat.

The key, though, is documenting.  Make drawings and document any changes you make to the original ship's wiring.

Thank you both.  BZ's to for each.   I cannot tell you how frustrating it is to sit down at a project ans say were are the Procedures, Technical Drawings, or how does this work and all you get is funny looks.         

For my guys.  Document, Document, Document...... 

and did I mention Document.......

Rick
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