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Author Topic: School of the boat 8 Oct O8 (fire fighting part 3)  (Read 6426 times)
emeacho
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« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2008, 01:11:42 PM »

The oxygen system on a diesel boat of WWII was called "O2 cylinders".  They are placed in every compartment, usually hung in the overhead from brackets.  The nukes have O2 generators that supply O2 banks.  The banks can bleed inboard.

To remove CO2, the crew spread LiOH (lithium hydroxide) out on mattress covers and the chemical absorbed the CO2.  Watch it, the stuff got hot when it reacted with CO2.  The LiOH canisters were kind of oblong in the old days and after WWII they were round, gray cans.  They were hung from brackets in the overhead or from the side of the pressure hull on brackets in every compartment.  The torpedo rooms had hundreds of them, probably because these were the spaces where you would congregate in an escape attempt.  Torsk has a bunch of these canisters which we found on the Trout.  Razorback also has a bunch.  I know Pampanito reproduced a bunch of the WWII type.

The nukes now adays use CO2 scrubbers and CO/H2 burners to remove unwanted gas.  In an emergency, the bunk curtains are CO2 absorbant.
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JTheotonio
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« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2008, 02:30:23 PM »

Correct for part of the questions.  Here is a newer (from USS Albacore) CO2 canister


* canisters.JPG (110.08 KB, 640x427 - viewed 306 times.)
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-----
From the Forward Torpedo Room

John
JTheotonio
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« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2008, 02:34:16 PM »

Hey Darrin,

What is this for?


* DSC01979.JPG (30.67 KB, 320x480 - viewed 316 times.)
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From the Forward Torpedo Room

John
Ctwilley
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« Reply #18 on: October 15, 2008, 03:41:06 PM »

I think that the reason why they tell you to always use dry powder on class D fires now is due to the fact that there are several metals included in class d fires that, when burning, actually speed up combustion when they get wet.
Also, the magnesium fire depends on it's surroundings, if near an iron alloy and sodium chloride (salt), it can actually feed itself when wet. The salt water reacts with the iron and magnesium which produces it's own heat and hydrogen gas. Since burning magnesium can consume carbon dioxide, oxygen, and hydrogen, it can in essence, feed itself for a short time once water is added. In short, you've just made an MRE heater. Grin
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Darrin
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« Reply #19 on: October 15, 2008, 07:09:57 PM »

Great job Correy with the magnesium explanition,
and you hit a number of points that I didn't cover because the boats that I rode were almost always at sea and we had to worry about salt water hitting it and on the fire main it pulls in MORE salt water puts it into that area IF they did catch fire due to the fire hoses or the pyro locker flooding system being activated.. And yes there are a number of our museum boats still setting in salt water and that is one of those things that they have to worry about.

John,
Ahh my friend I know what that is and it is taking EVERYTHING that I have to keep from putting that up as my screen saver or wall paper.. IF'n I remember correctly that is the alcohol tanks gauge and IF'n I remember correctly not only is the inner ring brass the outer mounting ring is also. Take the 6 screws out and remove the float gauge out and clean it back up and re-install it once more and make the TM's proud once more (prop that float gauge up a little bit to show some fuel in the tank)
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JTheotonio
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« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2008, 08:07:55 PM »

Yes Darrin - it is what you think. Torpedo alcohol tank from the forward room
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From the Forward Torpedo Room

John
Darrin
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« Reply #21 on: October 15, 2008, 08:14:26 PM »

The preverbial "pink lady" tank coolsmiley  Never had one on a 688 but it wasn't too hard to finger out as to what it is and what it is for.. Ya might want to open that tank up and do a "visual inspection" on it to see if there is any residual liquid in the tank that may or may not be torpedo alcohol Wink
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