SUBMARINEMUSEUMS.ORG

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
June 19, 2018, 12:09:59 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
There are banners to put on your website HERE
11074 Posts in 1379 Topics by 184 Members
Latest Member: SonofaClamagoreVet
* Home Help Search Calendar Personal Messages Members Login Register
+  SUBMARINEMUSEUMS.ORG Forum
|-+  General Boards
| |-+  Submarine Related Chatter
| | |-+  School of the Boat (Moderator: Darrin)
| | | |-+  Quick Pop Quiz
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Quick Pop Quiz  (Read 5102 times)
JTheotonio
Chief Petty Officer
*

Total BZs: 8
Offline Offline

Posts: 771



View Profile WWW
« on: October 29, 2008, 09:24:50 AM »

This is just a quick pop quiz.

In the attached picture there is one major piece of emergency equipment.  What is it and how do you use it?

 Grin

* DSC01983a.pdf (733.63 KB - downloaded 242 times.)
Logged

-----
From the Forward Torpedo Room

John
Fred Tannenbaum
Unofficial Independent USS Silversides Historian
Petty Officer 2nd Class
*

Total BZs: 7
Offline Offline

Posts: 152



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2008, 10:18:56 AM »

OK, it's not the smoke detector!

If it's the green emergency light in the overhead, it turns on automatically when the main power goes out

If it's the red wheels, they engage the emergency hydraulics for the steering system or the auxiliary helm in the control room, including hand-steering.

Fred
Logged
Mark Sarsfield
Former USS Batfish Volunteer
Chief Petty Officer
*

Total BZs: 9
Offline Offline

Posts: 1532



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2008, 11:16:11 AM »

This CR is laid out a lot differently than ours (Batfish).
Logged


Regards,
Mark Sarsfield
USS Batfish reenactor



"If you have one bucket that can hold 5 gallons and one bucket that can hold 2 gallons, how many buckets do you have?" - IQ test from Idiocracy
emeacho
USS Torsk Volunteer
Petty Officer 2nd Class
*

Total BZs: 4
Offline Offline

Posts: 188



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2008, 01:05:37 PM »

The green emergency lights do not turn on automatically.  There are on-off switches for each circuit.  Crew members in each compartment turn on the emergency lights if there is a loss of lighting.  There are two lights wired in series in each circuit.  They are wired across the battery terminals (they do not get power from DC lighting).  So 2 120 V light bulbs wired in series across the 250 V battery.  There are three or four circuits in each compartment.
Logged
JTheotonio
Chief Petty Officer
*

Total BZs: 8
Offline Offline

Posts: 771



View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2008, 08:30:34 PM »

It's big and right in front...
Logged

-----
From the Forward Torpedo Room

John
Lance Dean
USS Drum Fan
Forum Administrator
*

Total BZs: 10
Offline Offline

Posts: 1534


John calls me "Gunner"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2008, 11:14:02 PM »

Aux gyro compass?

Or the door?

 Grin
Logged

JTheotonio
Chief Petty Officer
*

Total BZs: 8
Offline Offline

Posts: 771



View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2008, 09:38:22 PM »

something to drive with
Logged

-----
From the Forward Torpedo Room

John
Darrin
USS Torsk Volunteer
Moderator
*

Total BZs: 17
Offline Offline

Posts: 1286


School of the Boat Guru


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2008, 09:53:05 PM »

Hmmmmmm would it by chance be the Emergency Steering Wheel???
Logged

JTheotonio
Chief Petty Officer
*

Total BZs: 8
Offline Offline

Posts: 771



View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2008, 11:26:00 PM »

ok how does it work?
Logged

-----
From the Forward Torpedo Room

John
Darrin
USS Torsk Volunteer
Moderator
*

Total BZs: 17
Offline Offline

Posts: 1286


School of the Boat Guru


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2008, 08:34:15 AM »

 Operation of the system on EMERGENCY power. The steering wheel (1) is disconnected from its shaft by pulling out the locking pin in the hub, and then pulling the wheel aft, disengaging it from the clutch jaw on the drive shaft. The locking arm underneath the wheel is pulled up to a horizontal position to hold one of the wheel spokes in its fork, and locked in that position by inserting the pin under it.

The change valve (2) is set at EMERGENCY.

The clutch handle (1, Figure 4-15) is up, the locking bar arm (9, Figure 4-15) is pulled out and turned, allowing the shaft of the emergency control valve to be turned.

The motor (3, Figure 4-26) is OFF.

The steering manifold (9) hand cut-out and ram cut-out valves are OPEN.

The emergency steering valves in the main hydraulic system main supply and return manifolds (16 and 17) are now opened (see Chapter 3).

The system is now ready for operation on EMERGENCY.

The submarine is steered from the control room by turning the small emergency hand wheel (13). Let us suppose the submarine is running on a straight coarse, the rudder indicator showing zero degrees deflection. The steersman receives the order, "Right 20 degree rudder." He turns the emergency steering wheel to the left.

Its motion is transmitted through the spur gears (14) to the emergency control valve shaft (15). This turns the nonrising stem inside the valve, raising the sleeve and opening the channel from the pressure line of the main hydraulic system to one of the lines leading to the auxiliary power ports on the steering system main manifold (9).

Oil from the main hydraulic system will
   then flow through the emergency control valve to the manifold (9), into the forward end of the port ram (10) and the after end of the starboard ram (11). The port ram moves aft, the starboard ram moves forward; the connecting rods (12) swing the crosshead and rudder to the right.
But we have not yet followed the movement of oil in the system to the completion of its cycle. We have already traced the path of the oil from the main hydraulic system until it reached and actuated the rams. When the port ram has moved aft and the starboard ram has moved forward, the oil is driven out of the opposite ends of the main cylinders, back through the manifold (9) into the return port of the emergency control valve, and out into the return line to the main hydraulic return manifold, completing its cycle.

WARNING. It is necessary to turn the change valve to EMERGENCY before operating the emergency control valve. Turning the change valve to EMERGENCY blanks off all lines except the bypass ports around the telemotor pump, and thus protects the rest of the equipment from the effects of the sudden entrance of oil at a pressure of 600 pounds to 700 pounds per square inch. Oil under high pressure will actuate various moving parts accessible to it, motorize pumps, and may cause various sudden, and possibly dangerous, results to apparatus or personnel. Disconnecting the main steering wheel when changing the system over to EMERGENCY, is an added precaution.

 Gotta love the Fleet submarine manual  smitten
Logged

JTheotonio
Chief Petty Officer
*

Total BZs: 8
Offline Offline

Posts: 771



View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2008, 12:22:00 PM »

Bingo -  Cheesy

If you have never done it - it was a trip.  That little wheel is a bit more challenging that the normal helm in the Conning Tower.

However, today's nucs would see no challenge I guess sitting in fine chairs in front of their flight control joysticks.
Logged

-----
From the Forward Torpedo Room

John
Darrin
USS Torsk Volunteer
Moderator
*

Total BZs: 17
Offline Offline

Posts: 1286


School of the Boat Guru


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2008, 02:45:41 PM »

John,
On 718 we didn't have to worry about going to emergency steering because it did it for us 2funny    Seriously, on Honolulu our steering was different from every other 688 at the time because we were the first "fly by wire" boat in the fleet. While there was little difference when it changed over it was a little unnerving at the time to be setting the planes and see it shift on the BCP (Ballast Control Panel) and then having to wait on the MM's to tell us that something had failed.

Sadly I have no pics of Honolulu's control room because at the Diving Officers feet on every first flight 688 was the emergency rudder stick and on Hono there wasn't one, made qualifiying other boats fun for the hydraulics part of their qual cards, and intereseting as hell to drive after driving Hono for a few years because we used to practice going to emergency from time to time to keep our quals, first time I rode a boat with a "emergency rudder stick" was a trip because the CO waited until those of us riders took our places to see how much or how little we knew about his boat... the learning curve was steep but fun and he later tried to adopt me after saving his butt during a TRE (Tactical Rediness Evaluation).
Logged

JTheotonio
Chief Petty Officer
*

Total BZs: 8
Offline Offline

Posts: 771



View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2008, 08:23:50 PM »

Well I said ther is a best difference.. Smiley
Logged

-----
From the Forward Torpedo Room

John
Darrin
USS Torsk Volunteer
Moderator
*

Total BZs: 17
Offline Offline

Posts: 1286


School of the Boat Guru


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2008, 10:13:10 PM »

The hydraulics for the room was dead on from one boat to another but aft of that it gets a little funny depending on the hull number of the first flight 688... hell 718 had it's own that no other boat could use because of the fly by wire, split stern planes and an emergency hydraulic accumulator fwd.. we was a bastage boat and we loved that old boat, too bad she is for the most part gone now.. my room still lives on on the San Francisco (SSN 711) or at least part of it is still alive Cry
Logged

Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
USSVI LIB Restoration Supporter HNSA USSVWWII


Google last visited this page May 12, 2018, 12:13:36 PM