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Author Topic: 20 die on Russian submarine  (Read 3255 times)
Lance Dean
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« on: November 08, 2008, 08:44:42 PM »

Read here:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7718156.stm
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Lance Dean
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« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2008, 10:24:37 PM »


More here:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27609821

MOSCOW - An accident aboard a nuclear-powered Russian navy submarine doing a test run in the Pacific Ocean on Saturday killed more than 20 people, the navy said.

The nuclear reactor aboard the submarine was operating normally and radiation levels were normal, navy spokesman Capt. Igor Dygalo said on Sunday.

The accident occurred when a fire-extinguishing system went into operation in error aboard the submarine, Dygalo said. He said the dead included sailors and shipbuilders.
The submarine was heading back to shore on its own power, and 21 people injured in the accident were evacuated to a ship that was escorting the sub. There were 208 people total aboard the vessel.

Russia's navy has been plagued by deadly accidents, including the explosions that sank the nuclear-powered submarine Kursk in 2000, killing all 118 seamen aboard.

Sunday's accident came as the Kremlin seeks to restore Russia's naval reputation. A naval squadron is headed to Venezuela for joint exercises this month in a show of force near U.S. shores.
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JTheotonio
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« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2008, 01:55:18 PM »

The story sounds too familiar - what is said may not be what really happened.  A fire extinguishing system causes people to die?

I just don't think I'd ride a Russian sub... buck2
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« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2008, 02:00:10 PM »

I heard something on TV that said something about freon leaking that caused suffocation.
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"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing" - Edmund Burke
Rick
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« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2008, 02:58:32 PM »

I just cannot believe the number of "accedents" that occur in the Russian navy.  Maybe we have as many and we just cover them up better.

Rick
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JTheotonio
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« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2008, 05:08:58 PM »

How happened to them at we don't hear about? And freon doesn't set off a sprinkler system.  I feel truly sorry for those men.  It's not their fault.
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« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2008, 05:17:16 PM »

This is interesting.  Freon is a heavy compound gas, and therefore should settle to the floor, or at least lower levels.  It is also non-flammable.  So again the sprinkler system makes no sense unless there was a fire.  Also, from what I post with this - how fast can a boat get to the surface and start to ventilate the boat? 
.....

You are at risk if you have been exposed whether by accident or on purpose.

The type and severity of an individuals reaction cannot be predicted without detailed medical examination and assessment prior to exposure - and even then the results will be, at best, an opinion.

Freon is a refrigerant gas that is toxic and, if inhaled or ingested, can cause a wide variety of physiological symptoms both immediately and in the long term.

The most common poisoning occurs when people intentionally sniff freon. This is extremely dangerous and can lead to long-term brain damage and sudden death.

In these circumstances the exact composition of the gas, the quantity & concentration inhaled and any contamination from the container utilised are all unknowns.

Symptoms

    * Lungs
          o Difficulty in Breathing (from inhalation)
          o Swelling of the Throat (which may also cause respiratory distress)
    * Eyes, ears, nose, and throat
          o Severe pain in the throat
          o Severe pain or burning in the nose, eyes, ears, lips, or tongue
          o Loss of vision
    * Gastrointestinal
          o Severe abdominal pain
          o Vomiting
          o Burns of the oesophagus (food pipe)
          o Vomiting blood
          o Blood in the stool
    * Heart and blood vessels
          o Palpitations and irregular heart-beat
          o Ventricular fibrillation and death (sudden sniffing death syndrome)
          o Collapse
    * Nervous System
    * ** Dizziness
          o Headache
          o Confusion
          o Loss of co-ordination (do not drive if affected!)
          o Unconsciousness
    * Skin
          o Irritation
          o Frostbite
          o Burns
          o Necrosis (holes) in the skin or underlying tissues

Seek immediate emergency medical care. Most of the symptoms listed result from breathing in (inhaling) the substance.

Move the person to fresh air. Be careful to avoid being overcome with the fumes while helping someone else especially in confined spaces and if bending down to administer aid (see below).

Please note that Freon is more dense than air and will therefore tend to 'flow' downhill and accumulate at floor level, in depressions & hollows. This is particularly important with a patient that has collapsed as they may still be breathing in fumes at ground level. Concentrations in confined spaces may become high enough to poison 'observers' as well as 'participants'.

The emergency services will need to know:

    * The patient's age, weight, and condition
    * The name of the product (ingredients and strengths, if known) *
    * The time it was swallowed or inhaled
    * The amount swallowed or inhaled

* This is especially important as some drugs used in resuscitation interact with Freon.

How well a patient does depends on the severity of the poisoning and how quickly medical help was received.

Severe lung damage may occur. Survival past 72 hours usually means the patient will have a complete recovery.

Long-term abusers of freon can have permanent brain damage and early death.

As if that were not enough Freon is considered carcinogenic and is bad for the environment in as much as it breaks down ozone.
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« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2008, 02:11:18 PM »

I guess we should not have been huffing all that freon in the AF Computer room.     Grin
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JTheotonio
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« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2008, 02:26:58 PM »

Some kids did do that to get high. crazy2

Latest on the Russians was that most of those killed were sleeping at the time of the accident.  Hum! Says a lot for safey drills.  Also most were yardbirds.  I think only about 3 were actually crew members.  They had over 200 people crammed on that boat.
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