Author Topic: School of the boat for 29 Oct (Drain system)  (Read 5104 times)

Offline Darrin

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School of the boat for 29 Oct (Drain system)
« on: October 29, 2008, 09:02:10 AM »
Ok folks,
Now that JT was nice enough to talk about DC and the trim system and even a little about the drain system we are going to cover the Drain system to include operation of the system, the description of the pump (what powers it and how much and a basic over view of how it works) and what areas it can pump water out and other uses if needed.

Good luck all with this one,

Offline emeacho

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Re: School of the boat for 29 Oct (Drain system)
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2008, 12:52:39 PM »
Well for starters, the Drain Pump is located in the Motor Room aft port corner.  It is powered from the fuse panel on the Aft DC Distribution Switchboard, which is located in Maneuvering.

The pump aboard Torsk is a multi-stage centrifugal pump. The old boats must have had a reciprocating pump (Fleet Submarine Manual).

Offline Mark Sarsfield

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Re: School of the boat for 29 Oct (Drain system)
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2008, 01:36:03 PM »
Taken from Submarine Trim and Drain Systems, Navpers 16166, Chapter 3A...

"The drain pump, located in the pump room, provides suction for the drain system. The pump is started and stopped by means of an electric push-button switch located nearby in the pump room. The drain pump has a suction and a discharge connection. A suction line equipped with a strainer and a sight glass connects the suction side of the pump with the main forward and after drain lines, usually called the drain line forward and the drain line aft. The drain line forward and the drain line aft can be cut off by shutting their respective stop valves, located in the pump room. "

"...the drain line forward extends to the forward torpedo room and provides pumping connections for the two bilges and the pitometer log well in the after section of the torpedo room. The drain line terminates at the forward bilge manifold, with two valves controlling the suction from the poppet valve drain tank and the forward bilge."

"There are no drain line connections in the forward battery compartment. "

"The drain line aft extends to the after torpedo room and contains pumping connections to the sumps in the compartments in the after section of the submarine. There are no drain line connections in the after battery compartment. The forward engine room has two bilge sumps connecting with the drain line aft through two individual lines. The after engine room also has two bilge sumps which connect to the drain line by means of two separate lines. In addition to the bilge sump pumping connections, the drain line aft contains also a suction line to the collecting tank, making it possible for water from the collecting tank to be pumped out through the drain system.

There is one bilge sump in the motor room.

The drain line aft terminates in the after bilge manifold in the after torpedo room. Here too, the manifold contains two valves, controlling suction from the forward and after bilge sumps."

"Returning now to the pump room, the drain pump suction line carries a branch connection to the pump room bilge manifold. This manifold contains three valves controlling suction from the three pump room bilge sumps.

The drain water from the gun access trunk, the cable trunk, the periscopes, and the antenna wells empties into the pump room bilge and collects in the sumps from which it is pumped when required.
The drain pump has three points to which it may discharge: 1) the overboard discharge; 2) the compensating water main; and 3) the trim system. In addition, the drain pump is so interconnected with the trim manifold that it can discharge water into the trim system instead of into its own piping."

"Every branch suction line to the bilge sumps has its own bilge stop valve. When it is desired to pump out certain bilge sumps, or wells, the valves leading from them to the drain line and the pump are opened. The required discharge valves are then opened to the overboard discharge, the compensating water main, or the trim system, depending
   upon the conditions. Then the drain pump is started and the pumping begins. When the pumping is completed, the pump is stopped, and the valves to the various lines used in the operation are shut. "

"Bilge water should not be discharged directly overboard if there is danger of detection by the enemy, because the oil in it will rise to the surface, indicating the presence of the submarine. Instead, bilge water should be pumped into the expansion tank, where the water separates from the oil before being discharged overboard.

If the trim system is used to receive the bilge drainage, it is possible to pump this water into the variable ballast tanks. But this may be a hazard to security, because discharging variable tanks to sea during trimming operations will allow bilge oil to rise to the surface, leaving the telltale oil slick."


If you want more operating details, I can post the step by step process.




Regards,
Mark Sarsfield
USS Batfish reenactor



"If you have one bucket that can hold 5 gallons and one bucket that can hold 2 gallons, how many buckets do you have?" - IQ test from Idiocracy

Offline Darrin

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Re: School of the boat for 29 Oct (Drain system)
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2008, 08:13:59 PM »
Very good Mark and Chief Mike, the only thing that neither one of you discussed how many volts did it run on and how fast did it run... BTW BZ to both of you for getting this one so fast

Offline emeacho

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Re: School of the boat for 29 Oct (Drain system)
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2008, 12:31:40 PM »
Sorry, the DC Distribution switchboards, forward and aft, are powered from 250 VDC.  So, the answer is: the drain pump (and the trim pump) is powered from 250 VDC.

Offline Darrin

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Re: School of the boat for 29 Oct (Drain system)
« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2008, 01:04:36 PM »
Just a little more information about the drain pump:

B. DRAIN PUMP
 
3B1. Source of power. An electric motor, rated at 10 horsepower and 1150 revolutions per minute, is used to drive the drain pump through-a worm and worm gear assembly as shown in Figure 3-1. The two types of pumps in use are shown in this illustration. One has a vertically mounted motor and is shown in the large cutaway view; the other has the "motor mounted horizontally and is shown in the upper left-hand corner of Figure 3-1. The cutaway view shows the mechanical construction of the pump.
3B2. Description. The drain pump is a single acting duplex reciprocating pump with the cylinders mounted vertically. The two plungers are connected to the crankshaft by connecting rods, so that one plunger completes its downward travel at the moment the other plunger completes its upward travel. As a plunger moves upward in the cylinder, it creates vacuum, or suction. This lowered pressure
   "draws" water into the cylinder through the valves from the inlet, or suction, port. When the plunger reaches the top of its stroke and starts its downward travel, the water forces the suction valve down, closing the inlet port, opening the discharge valve, and allowing the water to flow out of the discharge port. At the same time, the second plunger is performing the reverse operation, taking a suction while the first plunger is discharging. This results in a continuous flow of water through the pump.
An air chamber is provided for each cylinder to smooth out the flow and quiet the pump operation by cushioning the discharge. Air in the chamber is compressed during discharge. When the plunger reaches the end of its stroke, expansion of this air tends to keep the water flowing until the reverse stroke begins.

A connection is provided to the 225-pound air system for recharging the chambers
 

Offline emeacho

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Re: School of the boat for 29 Oct (Drain system)
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2008, 09:01:26 PM »
I might just add that many of the boats had the drain pump replaced with a centrifugal type pump that required a priming pump to ensure the suction of the drain pump was flooded before the pump was started.  The priming system also had a Nash float valve.  Shades of my days on the Von Steuben.