Author Topic: Name That Radio  (Read 5078 times)

Offline Mark Sarsfield

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Name That Radio
« on: August 11, 2010, 07:22:51 PM »
I noticed that you have your original radio receiver in the ward room in the forward cabinet.  I've seen the same radio in a picture of Capt. Fyfe eating Christmas dinner aboard the Batfish.  What is the brand and model?  Were the officers able to tune in their own radio stations with this?  Thanks.

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Mark Sarsfield
USS Batfish reenactor



"If you have one bucket that can hold 5 gallons and one bucket that can hold 2 gallons, how many buckets do you have?" - IQ test from Idiocracy

Offline Paul Farace

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Re: Name That Radio
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2010, 02:07:04 PM »
The radio in the wardroom is one of two that were aboard during the war. We have both. One model was photographed in her commissioning pictures and the other model was used on the 7th patrol.  They are RBO's from Scott Radio Corp.  One is an RBO and the other is an RBO 2  I think... I will check.

These were standard short-wave radios with the standard AM broadcast band and a phonograph input (not unlike a home entertainment receiver today) and yes, they were used to tune in entertainment and to amplify the phonograph output.
These were used well into the 1970s!
Johnny Cash's third cousin, twice removed

Offline Mark Sarsfield

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Re: Name That Radio
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2010, 11:27:37 AM »
I'll have to keep an eye out for one.  Granted, the AM band has changed since the 30's and 40's.

Regards,
Mark Sarsfield
USS Batfish reenactor



"If you have one bucket that can hold 5 gallons and one bucket that can hold 2 gallons, how many buckets do you have?" - IQ test from Idiocracy

Offline Paul Farace

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Re: Name That Radio
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2010, 12:05:43 PM »
I am not a radio expert but I am not aware that the AM band has changed!!!  I have seen monster consol sized livingroom radios from the late 1930's that have the same AM range that my car radio has today!   
Johnny Cash's third cousin, twice removed

Offline Mark Sarsfield

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Re: Name That Radio
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2010, 01:02:02 PM »
I had a portable 1937 Motorola AM radio that was outside of the current AM band.  I sold it to another reenactor, but I might still have a photo of it.

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Mark Sarsfield
USS Batfish reenactor



"If you have one bucket that can hold 5 gallons and one bucket that can hold 2 gallons, how many buckets do you have?" - IQ test from Idiocracy

Offline KA8VIT

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Re: Name That Radio
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2012, 08:48:42 PM »
I somehow missed this post before, but here is the history of the AM Broadcast Band here in the U.S.

* The Standard Broadcast Band began in 1921 with just one frequency (833 kHz).

* In December 1921, 619 kHz was added for Weather and Market reports.

* In September 1922, 750 kHz was added as a new "Entertainment" frequency.

* On May 15, 1923, the Standard Broadcast Band was expanded to 550-1360 kHz using 10 kHz steps.

* In April 1925, this was further expanded to 550-1500 kHz.

* November 11, 1928 saw the first big "realignment" as the FRC shifted many stations, and deleted others, in an attempt to reduce interference.

* On March 29, 1941, the band was extended to 550-1600 kHz. On this date, the NARBA frequency shift changed many stations spot on the dial.

* In the early 1950s, the band was extended to 540-1600 kHz. The first 540s appeared in 1954 or 1955.

* In mid-1961, most Class IV stations were permitted to increase power from 250 Watts to 1/.25 kW.

* In 1983, most Class IV stations were permitted to increase power from 1/.25 kW to 1 kW.

* In 1995, the FCC again extended the Standard Broadcast Band to 540-1702 kHz.
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